Courtesy of Martine Kei Green-Rogers

Courtesy of Martine Kei Green-Rogers

Martine Kei Green-Rogers is a graceful wearer of many professional hats. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Theatre where she teaches theatre history and script analysis. She is a dramaturg for several regional theatres. She is an expert on all things Shakespeare. And, luckily for the College of Fine Arts, she can wear these hats simultaneously.  

As dramaturg, Professor Green-Rogers defines her role as “keeper of the story. I take the director’s concept and marry it with the text to advocate for the playwright. I make the marriage harmonious.” In addition to dramaturgs serving the director’s vision, they also help designers and directors by performing historical research.

Professor Green-Rogers has worked as dramaturg with the largest regional theatre in the country—the Oregon Shakespeare Festival—since 2007. With this season’s production of William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors, Green-Rogers has worked with the Festival to mount the classical work with a Harlem Renaissance twist. See the trailer:  

So, how does this marriage look when using a script from the 17th Century and partnering it with 1920s New York? According to Green-Rogers, “It’s a lot of fun. Audiences are eating it up with a spoon!”

Professor Green-Rogers also works closely with the Court Theatre in Chicago, and will for the next six months. In this role, she will lead discussions with the audience. “It’s an interesting dance figuring out the heart of a show,” she said.

Aside from her contract with the Court Theatre, Professor Green-Rogers will serve as dramaturg for One Man, Two Guvnors at Pioneer Theatre Company this fall. 

Posted
AuthorThe Finer Points
Photo courtesy of www.nwdanceproject.org

Photo courtesy of www.nwdanceproject.org

To keep pace with Department of Modern Dance Professor Eric Handman’s quickly expanding list of achievements, one needs to start with all he’s done in just the first half of 2014. First, Eric Handman’s piece Disappearing Days was featured at the American College Dance Festival (ACDFA) West Regional Conference. Then, the piece was awarded an honorable mention by the ACDFA and Dance Magazine, the only work to be singled out with this distinction. Next, his work was selected for the upcoming Pretty Creatives showing at the Northwest Dance Project in Portland, Ore., where he had only 18 hours to create a dance piece.

Handman shows no signs of slowing down, as his resume of commissioned works continues to grow, including choreographic credits with The College of Northern Colorado, coŸda Dance Company in Salt Lake City, Verve Dance Company in Phoenix, and the Contemporary Dance Company for the Universidad Nacional Costa Rica.

Read more about Professor Handman’s upcoming show in Portland, Ore. here

Posted
AuthorThe Finer Points

Dean Raymond Tymas-Jones published a compelling piece as a guest author for the Americans for the Arts blog on the concept of STEM education. 

"While the need for advanced new knowledge in the STEM fields is unquestionable, the development of all human talent requires equal emphasis in the arts and humanities.  Nevertheless, the key is not found in a silo approach but in an integrative or collaborative model."

Read the blog in its entirety here

The Department of Ballet consistently collaborates with prominent ballet artists from around the world. With a close relationship with regional ballet company Ballet West and a faculty roster with extensive professional and teaching experience, it comes as no surprise the Department of Ballet recently hosted the American Ballet Theatre’s National Training Curriculum (ABT) program on campus. The ABT training embraces ballet principles and elements of the French, Russian and Italian schools of ballet training to focus on proper body alignment, kinetics and coordination, and student knowledge of classical ballet technique.

Aside from the honor of hosting the course at the University of Utah, the ABT curriculum’s co-author Raymond Lukens, artistic associate at NYU and faculty at the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School, presented the 10-day workshop in Utah.

ABT presenters and Department of Ballet faculty during the training session. Photo courtesy of Maggie Tesch. 

ABT presenters and Department of Ballet faculty during the training session. Photo courtesy of Maggie Tesch. 

The University’s Associate Professor and Lecturer Maggie Tesch, an ABT-certified instructor, received an invitation to host a regional course, presented only in select U.S. cities. ABT’s courses focus on raising the quality of training for teachers nationwide to more fully understand the best practices in teaching philosophy, child development, dance psychology and anatomy.

“We, in the Department of Ballet, strive to provide our students studying in the teaching emphasis with the highest quality instruction, and this ABT offering aligns with this goal providing us the opportunity to be on the leading edge of ballet pedagogy,” Tesch said.

Tesch also emphasized that ballet instructors across the region who participated in the workshop received a rare opportunity, as most workshops only occur in the New York area. This local exposure and opportunity is yet another way the Department of Ballet to make its mark on the community and the next generation of ballet dancers.

Bravo!